Do You Need Rental Car Insurance?

| January 25, 2019

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•  It’s a familiar scenario for anyone who has rented a car lately: You’re tired after a long flight, and it’s finally your turn at the rental car counter. The agent is pleasant until it’s time to talk insurance, when he rattles off all the dire potential consequences of declining the company’s coverage. You’re tempted to buy the insurance, get him off your back, and get on with your trip. Hold up, though: Before you spend a mint on rental car insurance, you’ll want to see whether you’re already covered by your own personal insurance policy and credit card benefits. We’ll break down what rental car insurance covers, whether your own insurance makes it redundant, and a handful of situations where spending the extra money actually could be a smart move. Rental Car Insurance 101 Overwhelmed by all the fine print on that contract? Do you see a lot of confusing acronyms? Here’s how to decode rental car coverage: Loss/collision damage waiver: The loss damage waiver, or LDW, is sometimes called the collision damage waiver, or CDW. The LDW lets you off the hook for costs if your rental car is stolen, vandalized, or damaged in a crash. This may include loss of use charges, which rental car companies charge for lost profits when they must repair a vehicle.

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Insurance Fraud Investigators Group (IFIG)

Insurance Fraud Investigators Group is a Members Organisation dedicated to the detection and prevention of Insurance Fraud. It is a non-profit making organisation created to tackle the growing problem of Insurance Fraud in the UK and disrupt insurance fraudsters. Members include Insurers, Lawyers, Loss Adjusters, and Investigation Agencies all of whom are committed to preventing Insurance Fraud. On 1st October 2008 IFIG became one of the first organisations in the UK to be acknowledged by the Government as a 'Specified Anti-Fraud Organisation' under the Serious Crime Act 2007.

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Article | April 12, 2021

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Spotlight

Insurance Fraud Investigators Group (IFIG)

Insurance Fraud Investigators Group is a Members Organisation dedicated to the detection and prevention of Insurance Fraud. It is a non-profit making organisation created to tackle the growing problem of Insurance Fraud in the UK and disrupt insurance fraudsters. Members include Insurers, Lawyers, Loss Adjusters, and Investigation Agencies all of whom are committed to preventing Insurance Fraud. On 1st October 2008 IFIG became one of the first organisations in the UK to be acknowledged by the Government as a 'Specified Anti-Fraud Organisation' under the Serious Crime Act 2007.

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