THE FIVE TECHNOLOGY TRENDS TO WATCH, AND HOW THEY WILL IMPACT THE INSURANCE INDUSTRY

How the post-digital era will impact your businessAccenture s new Technology Vision for Insurance report outlines the key trends that will have an impact on insurers over the short to medium term. In this series, I have defined the post-digital era, discussed how insurers can build business models that thrive in this context, and have given pointers on how you can pivot your business towards the new With this framework in place, lets analyze the trends themselves, and unpack their relevance to insurers.

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GuideOne Insurance

Since the beginning, the people of GuideOne Insurance have demonstrated relentless commitment to social responsibility and to those working to do good. For more than 70 years, our products and services have protected our customers and their customers. We’ve provided coverage, guidance and peace of mind to more than 50,000 commercial policyholders, enabling them to focus on the things that matter most.

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Core Insurance, Risk Management

Cybersecurity Material for Private Companies

Article | September 22, 2022

Cyberattacks are one of the world's most pressing concerns. In fact, they were ranked among the top ten risks in the World Economic Forum's Global Risk Reports for 2020 and 2021. 1 According to the reports, cybercrime-as-a-service is becoming more affordable, accessible, and sophisticated. Though previously regarded as a technological issue, cybersecurity is now a growing ESG concern for private companies, investors, regulators, and consumers. Why cybersecurity is material for private companies Cyberattacks are significant issues for both private and public companies because they increase the risk of exposing confidential company information or sensitive customer data, disrupting supply chains, increasing regulatory scrutiny, and/or causing reputational harm. In 2021, the average cost of a data breach (including ransom payments and customer compensation) was $4.24 million per incident (the highest level in 17 years),8 and the global cost of cybercrime is expected to be $10.5 trillion annually by 2025. 9 Companies with marketable client or intellectual property information face increased financial risk as a result of the impact that data has on both their value and brand loyalty. Furthermore, firms that rely heavily on real-time operations can expect high per-minute costs of lost opportunity and revenue if a denial-of-service (DoS) attack occurs. As a result, while some attacks may result in no direct material loss, these risks can have a significant impact on a company's valuation by influencing brand perception and operating costs. Private companies should consider these potential risks when evaluating cybersecurity investments, as underspending can significantly increase long-term costs. Cybersecurity is a widespread and rapidly growing issue that has significant material impacts on private companies.These risks are especially relevant as private companies prepare to enter public markets, where strict oversight controls are regarded as good governance. Companies, in our opinion, must have the necessary expertise and infrastructure to navigate these significant risks and the corresponding increase in regulation and disclosure expectations.

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Insurance Technology

Digital Transformation in Insurance Industry

Article | July 15, 2022

Insurers of the future will play more of a risk avoidance role and less of a risk mitigation one. The seemingly effective yet simple ideas of Netflix, Uber, Ola, Amazon, and many other ideas have forever transformed their industry segments. Digital transformation in the insurance industry is embraced in various ways to address the complex challenges posed by consumers, regulatory, and digital landscapes. To keep up with insureds' demands, insurers have had to digitize various aspects of their operations. Any company that wants to stay competitive in today's market must meet customers where and when they need it. Insurance's digital transformation, powered by artificial intelligence, machine learning, predictive analytics, mobile services, live chat, and other technologies, enables insurers to do just that and will continue to change the industry for years. Insurance Companies to Look at Value Chain through a Digital Lens: Gain First-Mover Advantage: Product introduction to gain a potentially sustainable competitive advantage. To achieve the first-mover advantage, the insurer should have two crucial capabilities: the ability to pinpoint unmet customer needs to guide product development and quickly adapt existing products to market forces. Reduce IT costs to fund innovation: When insurance companies refactor monolithic applications into modular micro services, application maintenance costs are reduced. Grow revenue by differentiating the customer journey: Electronic document capture and processing, robotic process automation (RPA), and robo-advisors improve serviceability and help businesses gain a competitive advantage. Despite market participants' claims that the insurance industry was not an early adopter of digital transformation, new players, business models, and demanding customers are forcing the industry to embrace digital technologies. As a result, the global insurance market is expected to grow by 45% between 2022 and 2025. Modern digital engineering does not occur in a vacuum; new products must be compatible with existing technologies and processes. Ascertain that the development team understands legacy insurance applications and the data required to integrate them with new, digitally engineered products.

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Insurance Technology

How technology will transform life insurance

Article | August 9, 2022

Do you know what the UK insurance industry is going through? A disruption that calls for complete metamorphosis. Not so different from what the whole world is going through at the moment. Crafting one-size-fits-all products and expecting them to sell like hotcakes is a huge misconception. Customers want products to be as personalised as possible. Pay per mile insurance or lower car insurance premiums for safe drivers are some examples. In the current global crisis, personalised life insurance would look like factoring in the unique health/ living conditions of the person and then providing insurance options.

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Insurance Technology

Will your insurance IT investments pay off?

Article | April 12, 2021

Automated claims processing, price comparison platforms, mobile bill paying—these are just some of the digital services that insurance customers expect and insurers want to provide. As the demand for digital skyrockets, so does the need for insurers to invest in IT. In the past seven years, the share of IT in total operating costs of property-and-casualty (P&C) insurers increased 22 percent. The rise of digital means technology is no longer a cost center. Rather, it is an asset that, if managed well, can increase growth and profitability. But do these IT investments pay off? As the COVID-19 pandemic exacerbates already increasing cost pressures, insurers’ IT budgets are under scrutiny; they want to see the business impact of their IT investments. Insurers with targeted IT investments achieve better growth and performance Data from McKinsey’s Insurance 360° benchmarking survey provide strong evidence of the positive business impact of targeted IT investments. In fact, insurers that invest more in technology outpace competitors that don’t pursue targeted investments in business measures such as gross written premium (GWP) growth, return to shareholders, and expense and loss ratio (exhibit). As an example, in life insurance, companies that invested more in IT saw a greater reduction in expense ratios (by 2.0 percentage points) and higher returns on technical reserves2 (1.7 percentage points) when compared with insurers with lower IT investments. Insurers achieved these outcomes within three to five years of making their investments. For P&C insurers, those with high IT investments achieved approximately twice the top-line GWP growth of low IT investors. High IT investments also produced a greater reduction in combined ratios when compared with those with low IT investment. Four areas for targeted IT investment So what kinds of technology investments can help insurers achieve growth and improve productivity and performance? Investments in four areas are critical: Marketing and sales: Marketing technology solutions can increase sales and processing efficiency, improve the quality of core customer-facing processes such as policy inquiries and policy applications, and improve customers’ overall experiences. McKinsey’s Insurance 360° benchmarking data show that tech investments in this category can facilitate top-line growth for P&C insurers by up to 20–40 percent; for life insurers, that growth could be 10–25 percent over a three- to five-year period. Underwriting and pricing: Automated underwriting fraud detection can improve the likelihood that insurers correctly identify fraud and set accurate prices. A pricing tool kit that analyzes pricing across competitors and enables a flexible, more segmented market versus technical pricing further improves profit margins. Insurers that deploy these and other product, pricing, and underwriting technologies have seen improvements in their profit margins by 10–15 percent in P&C insurance and 3–5 percent in life insurance. Policy servicing: Workflow automation, artificial intelligence–based decision support, and user experience technologies in policy servicing and within IT can improve the customer self-service experience and automate back-office processes, thus reducing IT and operations expenses. And state-of-the-art self-servicing options will reduce processing times and even improve customer experience. An analysis of programs for large-scale insurance IT modernization finds that insurers that deploy these and other product, pricing, and underwriting technologies have seen improvements in their profit margins by 5–10 percent in P&C insurance and 10–15 percent in life insurance. Claims: P&C insurers can use automated case processing—machine-learning technology trained to process basic claims cases—to segment more complex cases and significantly improve claims accuracy. Combined with better partner integration and steering technologies embedded in a transformation of the claims operating model, such technologies can help P&C insurers improve profit margins by 25–40 percent, according to McKinsey analysis of large-scale IT modernization programs. To realize the full value of IT investments, insurers must strategically allocate their resources and view tech as an asset, not a tool.

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Spotlight

GuideOne Insurance

Since the beginning, the people of GuideOne Insurance have demonstrated relentless commitment to social responsibility and to those working to do good. For more than 70 years, our products and services have protected our customers and their customers. We’ve provided coverage, guidance and peace of mind to more than 50,000 commercial policyholders, enabling them to focus on the things that matter most.

Related News

Valued Policy Law and Total Loss

inredisputesblog | May 21, 2019

Typically, a fire insurance policy pays a policyholder for the actual cash value or the replacement value of the property destroyed. But in 20 states, if there is a total loss, the amount the insurer must pay is equal to the value of the property at the time the insurance policy was issued. What happens if the policy covers a multi-building complex and one of the buildings is destroyed? The Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals recently addressed this issue. In Norwood-Redfield Apartments Limited Partnership v. American Family Mutual Ins. Co., No. 18-2618 (8th Cir. May 16, 2019)(Unpublished), the appeals court affirmed a judgment in favour of the insurance company denying the policyholder’s claim to recover the full value listed on the policy of an entire complex of buildings when only one of the buildings was destroyed. The policyholder sued its insurance carrier after a fire destroyed one of the buildings out of 32 in the complex. The insurance carrier paid nearly $3 million for the loss, but the policyholder wanted the policy limits of over $31 million.

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Valued Policy Law and Total Loss

inredisputesblog | May 21, 2019

Typically, a fire insurance policy pays a policyholder for the actual cash value or the replacement value of the property destroyed. But in 20 states, if there is a total loss, the amount the insurer must pay is equal to the value of the property at the time the insurance policy was issued. What happens if the policy covers a multi-building complex and one of the buildings is destroyed? The Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals recently addressed this issue. In Norwood-Redfield Apartments Limited Partnership v. American Family Mutual Ins. Co., No. 18-2618 (8th Cir. May 16, 2019)(Unpublished), the appeals court affirmed a judgment in favour of the insurance company denying the policyholder’s claim to recover the full value listed on the policy of an entire complex of buildings when only one of the buildings was destroyed. The policyholder sued its insurance carrier after a fire destroyed one of the buildings out of 32 in the complex. The insurance carrier paid nearly $3 million for the loss, but the policyholder wanted the policy limits of over $31 million.

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